Blackjack2021

oldtimefamilybaseball:

The Four Best Screenshots from the Super Sluggers VHS commercial.

If you ever wondered what baseball in the 90s was like, it was basically this: 

  • Home runs
  • Muscles
  • Home runs and muscles
  • Todd Hundley

And while the internet wasn’t around to supply us with endless gifs of the action, at least there was the Super Sluggers VHS to keep as a memento which includes this great quote from Cecil Fielder: 

Height: 6’2”. Weight: currently unknown.”


Check out the video below and for anyone with the VHS at home, feel free to send it my way. 

I could seriously watch Superjail on endless repeat.  This is art.

JR’s make me homophobic

Someone is watching Babylon 5 while wearing beats by Dre headphones at DIK because why not? (there’s lots of reasons why not)

nfloffseason:

graydongordian:

gqmcgee:

momdressedmethismorning:

Kansas City Chiefs’ Quarterback Len Dawson having a cigarette & a bottle of Fresca after losing the very first Super Bowl  in 1967 this man gave zero fucks


No fucks whatsoever.

Time to start the Off Season. 

My hero

nfloffseason:

graydongordian:

gqmcgee:

momdressedmethismorning:

Kansas City Chiefs’ Quarterback Len Dawson having a cigarette & a bottle of Fresca after losing the very first Super Bowl  in 1967 this man gave zero fucks

No fucks whatsoever.

Time to start the Off Season. 

My hero

nfloffseason:

This was the halftime entertainment the last time the Ravens won the Super Bowl. The show featured Britney Spears, Aerosmith, Nelly, Mary J. Blige, and Justin Timberlake, back when he was still a musician a member of ‘N Sync. At the end, everyone sang “Walk This Way,” which totally surprised everyone watching. A hip-hop hybrid of “Walk This Way”? Crazy! But if Trent Dilfer can win a Super Bowl, anything’s possible.

nfloffseason:

This was the halftime entertainment the last time the Ravens won the Super Bowl. The show featured Britney Spears, Aerosmith, Nelly, Mary J. Blige, and Justin Timberlake, back when he was still a musician a member of ‘N Sync. At the end, everyone sang “Walk This Way,” which totally surprised everyone watching. A hip-hop hybrid of “Walk This Way”? Crazy! But if Trent Dilfer can win a Super Bowl, anything’s possible.

jasencomstock:

gravyholocaustsucks:



styro:



veggkat:



wilwheaton:



A group of self-appointed “patriots” are moving forward with an idea for a planned community of several thousand families of “patriotic Americans” in Idaho, a project named The Citadel, envisioned as a “martial endeavor designed to protect Residents in times of peril (natural or man-made).”
This is a very special kind of crazy.
(via “Liberty-Driven” Fortress Community Being Planned In Idaho | TPM LiveWire)



Jonestown.



More like Waco or Ruby Ridge.






Where is the daughter swap church?
edit: those walls will really help:  keeping casualites high when the FBI drops white phosphorous and napalm.

Wasn’t this a Warcraft 2 level?

jasencomstock:

gravyholocaustsucks:

styro:

veggkat:

wilwheaton:

A group of self-appointed “patriots” are moving forward with an idea for a planned community of several thousand families of “patriotic Americans” in Idaho, a project named The Citadel, envisioned as a “martial endeavor designed to protect Residents in times of peril (natural or man-made).”

This is a very special kind of crazy.

(via “Liberty-Driven” Fortress Community Being Planned In Idaho | TPM LiveWire)

Jonestown.

More like Waco or Ruby Ridge.

Where is the daughter swap church?

edit: those walls will really help:  keeping casualites high when the FBI drops white phosphorous and napalm.

Wasn’t this a Warcraft 2 level?

diadoumenos:

The Downton delusion: We love dramas about upstairs, downstairs life, but real Edwardian England saw a pampered few exploiting the poor majority

The appeal of Downton Abbey, Upstairs Downstairs and the innumerable sanitised costume-dramas with which television audiences and cinemagoers like to feast themselves is surely that they are pure escapism.
The last thing fans of these programmes want is to be confronted with the cruel reality of what life was like in late Victorian and Edwardian England, where there were children dying of starvation on the streets of most big cities, where 80,000 prostitutes, most of them riddled with incurable syphilis, plied their trade on the streets of London, and where the average age of death for a working-class man was 35.
There is, in fact, something highly distasteful about these kitsch reconstructions of life in the olden days. The truth is that life for the majority of men, women and children in Britain during the 19th and early 20th century was hellish…
In those days, the life expectancy for a working man or woman in Britain was lower than that of the poorest in a Third World country today. Coal miners, tin miners and steel workers were lucky to live beyond the age of 35.
The average age of death for a baker was 40, because of the long hours and appalling working conditions. Bakers worked 18 hours a day during the London ‘season’ so that the idle young rich could eat fresh bread rolls not only at late dinners but also at breakfast…
[E]ven in benign middle-class households, the servants were expected to do everything for the family, and this was before the days of vacuum cleaners or central heating or labour-saving kitchen devices…
They would be up long before dawn, brushing down the stairs with a dustpan and brush, cleaning out the clinker from innumerable grates, preparing trays, washing, scrubbing, scouring, polishing — usually with cleaning materials which required a lot of elbow-grease or, worse, were full of toxic chemicals.


This… also the show is just not very good.

diadoumenos:

The Downton delusion: We love dramas about upstairs, downstairs life, but real Edwardian England saw a pampered few exploiting the poor majority

The appeal of Downton Abbey, Upstairs Downstairs and the innumerable sanitised costume-dramas with which television audiences and cinemagoers like to feast themselves is surely that they are pure escapism.

The last thing fans of these programmes want is to be confronted with the cruel reality of what life was like in late Victorian and Edwardian England, where there were children dying of starvation on the streets of most big cities, where 80,000 prostitutes, most of them riddled with incurable syphilis, plied their trade on the streets of London, and where the average age of death for a working-class man was 35.

There is, in fact, something highly distasteful about these kitsch reconstructions of life in the olden days. The truth is that life for the majority of men, women and children in Britain during the 19th and early 20th century was hellish…

In those days, the life expectancy for a working man or woman in Britain was lower than that of the poorest in a Third World country today. Coal miners, tin miners and steel workers were lucky to live beyond the age of 35.

The average age of death for a baker was 40, because of the long hours and appalling working conditions. Bakers worked 18 hours a day during the London ‘season’ so that the idle young rich could eat fresh bread rolls not only at late dinners but also at breakfast…

[E]ven in benign middle-class households, the servants were expected to do everything for the family, and this was before the days of vacuum cleaners or central heating or labour-saving kitchen devices…

They would be up long before dawn, brushing down the stairs with a dustpan and brush, cleaning out the clinker from innumerable grates, preparing trays, washing, scrubbing, scouring, polishing — usually with cleaning materials which required a lot of elbow-grease or, worse, were full of toxic chemicals.

This… also the show is just not very good.